Krowdster Debuts New Crowdfunding Features For Investors

Krowdster Debuts New Crowdfunding Features For Investors

Krowdster, a data powered web app for crowdfunding campaign optimization and promotion, announced the addition of two new features to make it easier for crowdfunders to find targeted influencers and trending content in their industries. Josef Holm, the founder of Krowdster, stated: “Building a targeted, engaged audience on social media and identifying the right influencers and outlets to pitch to, are at the core of every successful crowdfunding marketing strategy. This used to be a tedious and expensive process, but fortunately something that Krowdster now provides a data driven solution for.” Krowdster is again using data powered technology to solve some of the biggest hurdles crowdfunders are facing today. These new features are the following: Influencer Search: A  keyword search to discover influencers, journalists, and bloggers in any niche, who have a following and who can help to get exposure for your crowdfunding campaign. This tool is best used long before launch to build rapport with the people in your space who can get the word out and propel your campaign forward. Trending Content: An easy way to discover blogs and news sites with trending content in any crowdfunding niche. Input search terms relevant to your campaign and discover content that is going viral on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Google. This information can be used to build targeted media lists of the blogs and news sites that are writing about similar topics. The company noted that both of the new features work for all donations or rewards crowdfunding campaigns as well as the newly approved equity crowdfunding types Regulation A+ and Title III of the JOBS...
Will Crowdfunding’s Empowerment of the "New 98%" Change the Economy?

Will Crowdfunding’s Empowerment of the "New 98%" Change the Economy?

There are many people who have their hopes pinned to equity crowdfunding—not the least of which are the entrepreneurs hoping to fund their startups. There is a cottage industry of those that see the bigger picture promised by crowdfunding. The NextGen Crowdfunding Conference held November 19th in Santa Monica was a place for the big thinkers to come together to talk about the possibilities and to hopefully create new realities. Can equity crowdfunding fulfill its promise? The democratization of capital—the new 98% Like most things these days, equity crowdfunding is political. You poke around for a few minutes and you’ll find plenty of blogs dedicated to bashing the capital markets and the 2% that make up the accredited investor pool. I have no interest in bashing the 2% or discouraging them from using their capital in established ways to fuel entrepreneurship. Having said that, what could happen if the liquid resources of the other 98%—I’ll call them the ‘new 98%’—could be unleashed on all the promise of our entrepreneurs? Successful entrepreneurs are the inspiration for the next generation Aubrey Chernick, someone you probably haven’t been reading about in this season of billionaires in the limelight, is the founder of NextGen Crowdfunding and one of the ‘Top 50 People in Los Angeles’ according to The Los Angeles Business Journal. Like most billionaires will tell you, he got where he is the hard way—he built his business. In 1976 he founded Candle, a software company that served the Fortune 500. The company eventually created a foundation and decades later you’ll see the words philanthropist associated with Chernick as much as entrepreneur....
Charles Koch Publishes New Book "Good Profit"

Charles Koch Publishes New Book "Good Profit"

The Market-Based Management® business philosophy that Charles created and helped apply throughout Koch companies is built on ten specific attributes. Market-Based Management Principles Integrity Conduct all affairs with integrity, for which courage is the foundation. Compliance Strive for 10,000% compliance with all laws and regulations, which requires 100% of employees fully complying 100% of the time. Stop, think and ask. Value Creation Create long-term value by the economic means for customers, the company and society. Apply MBM to achieve superior results by making better decisions, pursuing safety and environmental excellence, eliminating waste, optimizing and innovating. Principled Entrepreneurship™ Apply the judgment, responsibility, initiative, economic and critical thinking skills, and sense of urgency necessary to generate the greatest contribution, consistent with the company’s risk philosophy. Customer Focus Understand and develop relationships with customers to profitably anticipate and satisfy their needs. Knowledge Seek and use the best knowledge and proactively share your knowledge while embracing a challenge process. Develop measures that lead to profitable action. Change Anticipate and embrace change. Envision what could be, challenge the status quo and drive creative destruction through experimental discovery. Humility Exemplify humility and intellectual honesty. Constantly seek to understand and constructively deal with reality to create value and achieve personal improvement. Hold yourself and others accountable. Respect Treat others with honesty, dignity, respect and sensitivity. Appreciate the value of diversity. Encourage and practice teamwork. Fulfillment Find fulfillment and meaning in your work by fully developing your capabilities to produce results that create the greatest...

What Should Firms Disclose to Investors?

Finance chiefs are preparing for changes in one of their most fundamental tasks: figuring out what’s important enough to tell shareholders. (Illustration:Jon Krause) Regulators in the U.S. and abroad are tinkering with the concept of “materiality,” or how to determine what information is necessary for companies to disclose publicly. For companies, the sorting process is costly and complex, partly because what’s considered “material” varies from regulator to regulator. Congress and the Supreme Court also have their own ideas. “A lot of [companies] find it difficult to work with the concept of materiality,” said Hans Hoogervorst, chairman of the London-based International Accounting Standards Board. Last week the board proposed allowing corporate executives to exercise more of their own judgment on what’s crucial to include in public filings. At least a half-dozen standard setters, including accounting rule makers, the Securities and Exchange Commission and various stock exchanges, have guidelines on the subject. Some of them want companies to sharpen their focus to avoid overwhelming investors with useless information. The U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board announced plans in September to do away with its own standard and instead defer to one set by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1976. The board said it wanted to clarify that “materiality is a legal concept.” The SEC is also working on its own project to improve the usefulness of corporate disclosures and is seeking input from the public through the end of November. Business groups including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce say they plan to press the issue this year because of the growing complexity of deciding what information is crucial to keeping shareholders in...
Understanding government tax incentives for small businesses

Understanding government tax incentives for small businesses

There was a great deal of posturing and little explaining during recent fiscal negotiations, so it’s understandable if you couldn’t make out what the negotiations mean for small business owners. Indeed, small business owners (SBOs) risked losing some tax incentives that had been in place during the fiscal cliff fight. Fortunately, many important ones survived, and you have every opportunity to take advantage of them in your first year of business and beyond. There’s money on the table. Here’s a quick guide to understanding the tax breaks you can claim. Writing off start-up costs. It may have been hard to tell during the squabbles in Washington, but the Obama administration’s Small Business Jobs Act did one very concrete thing: It doubled the amount of money small business owners could deduct as start-up costs. SBOs can now write off $10,000 (formerly $5,000) in costs associated with opening your doors (or website) to the public. There is no expiration date for this tax break. The 179 deduction. The very popular Section 179 deduction gives small businesses (with capital expenses under $2 million) the opportunity to deduct up to $500,000 in expenses. This incentive applies to both new and used equipment, as long as it was placed in service during the tax year in question. It encourages you to go “all in” in the early stages of your business. For now, it is in place until the end of 2013. Bonus depreciation for purchases. Every business needs furniture, machines, and other types of equipment to compete. Bonus depreciation allows you to write off as much as 50 percent of an investment ahead of the standard depreciation...